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Matthew Taylor and 21st Century Enlightenment

Matthew Taylor is the RSA’s Chief Executive, and in this animation video he explores how the idea of 21st Century Enlightenment could help us meet today’s challenges.

As this video sums up many of the concerns of this website, we’ve decided to feature it on our home page.

RSA Animate – 21st Century Enlightenment
http://youtu.be/AC7ANGMy0yo

Don’t tell others about your goal setting!

Our goal setting is supposed to gain more power if we write our goals down. And it is conventional wisdom that, if we tell someone else we are further motivated to achieve them. However, “Entrepreneur, programmer, avid student of life” Derek Sivers suggests that nearly a century of psychological research shows it is better to keep your goals to yourself.

Derek Sivers: Keep your goals to yourself
http://youtu.be/NHopJHSlVo4

Why do we reach 40 and experience midlife crisis?

Founder of MindValley.com, Vishen Lakhiani, suggests that most people today are caught up in achieving what he calls “means goals”, rather than “ends goals”. As a result we are obsessed with day to day concerns, and suddenly reach our forties dissatisfied with where life has brought us.

The 3 Most Important Questions to Ask Yourself
http://youtu.be/f8eU5Pc-y0g

In this video, he reflects on the midlife crisis and offers a practical exercise to help us work out what each individual is really meant to do with his/her life.

(To download the PDF goal setting sheet, go to the YouTube address above.)

You can also sign up for the Finer Minds Newsletter, which gives you “unlimited access to life-changing tools and techniques, transformational personal growth guides and inspirational articles from the hottest authors on the planet” at http://www.finerminds.com/welcome-to-mindvalley.

Andrew Hamilton poses questions on how we treat others

Consulting Editor of Eureka Street, Andrew Hamilton, invites us to ask some hard questions of ourselves in the wake of an Australian election campaign in which the two parties capable of achieving government offered only a race to the bottom, appealing overwhelmingly to the baser aspects of human nature. He wonders how we will act, when faced with the increasing economic stresses brought on by an aging population and other strains on resources.

“In coming years we might expect the categories of those excluded from the claims of our shared humanity to become broader. They will include other unpopular, excluded and disadvantaged people within the community. The ageing of the population, the pressure on revenue and the expectation that we shall continue to enjoy the same wealth and services as before will mean that governments will be unable to meet all their commitments.

It is natural for governments in such circumstances to cut the support it gives to the disadvantaged, whether they be Indigenous communities, unemployed or addicted. This is easier when the sense of a shared humanity is weak. They can then be portrayed as other than us, and their claim to a shared humanity to be diminished by such qualities we attribute to them as laziness, addiction, innate stupidity and antisocial tendencies. Their support will then be measured, not by their need as human beings, but by their lesser status. It can be measured out to them as a gift conditioned by compliance with whatever conditions we impose on them.”

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